Eggs and risk of cardiovascular disease: What’s the latest evidence?

Updated meta-analysis (BMJ 2020;368:m513 | doi: 10.1136/bmj.m513) show that moderate egg consumption (up to one egg per day) is not associated with cardiovascular disease risk overall, and is associated with potentially lower cardiovascular disease risk in Asian populations.

Results from this cohort study and updated meta-analysis show that moderate egg consumption (up to one egg per day) is not associated with cardiovascular disease risk overall. Results were similar for coronary heart disease and stroke. Egg consumption seems to be associated with a slightly lower cardiovascular disease risk among Asian cohorts

A series of large, randomised studies with well defined interventions related to egg intake and with clinical outcomes ascertained over a decade is not on the horizon. So we are missing our theoretical “gold standard” basket of evidence.

The association between egg consumption and cardiovascular disease risk has been a topic of intense debate during the past decade
Findings from previous studies on egg consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease have been inconclusive. However, we do have other baskets: a recent meta-analysis of randomised clinical studies involving dietary interventions showed that higher egg consumption led to higher serum concentrations of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, [PMID-30596814] extending earlier findings [PMID-11333841] Since high LDL cholesterol is a causal factor in cardiovascular disease risk [PMID-28444290] this certainly scrambles the evidence base a little, and adds noise to the discussion.

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