How Should Clinicians Engage With Online Health Information?

How Should Clinicians Engage With Online Health Information?

From the ‘AMA Journal of Ethics – Illuminating the Art of Medicine’ Many adults, physicians, and medical students search the internet for health information. Open access has many benefits, but the variable quality of internet health information—ranging from evidence based to false—raises ethical concerns. Using Wikipedia as a case study, this article argues that everyone engaging with internet health information has ethical responsibilities. Those hosting and writing for health websites should ensure that information is evidence based, accurate, up to date, and readable and be transparent about conflicts of interest. Health care professionals, including medical students, have both ethical responsibilities

Screening and General Health Checks in adults – the latest from Cochrane

Screening and General Health Checks in adults – the latest from Cochrane

Screening and prevention ‘Screening is a way of finding out if people are at higher risk of a health problem so that early treatment can be offered or information given to help them make informed decisions. Screening is a way of identifying apparently healthy people who may have an increased risk of a particular condition. The (NHS UK) offers a range of screening tests to different sections of the population. The aim is to offer screening to the people who are most likely to benefit from it. For example, some screening tests are only offered to newborn babies, while others

Phishing – stealing legitimate user credentials

Phishing – stealing legitimate user credentials

Phishing is a form of fraud in which an attacker masquerades as a reputable entity or person in email or other communication channels. The attacker uses phishing emails to distribute malicious links or attachments that can perform a variety of functions, including the extraction of login credentials or account information from victims. One common explanation for the term is that phishing is a homophone of fishing, and is so named because phishing scams use lures to catch unsuspecting victims, or fish. [LINK] Phishing attacks typically rely on social networking techniques applied to email or other electronic communication methods, including direct messages

What we learned in 2018 in Health & Medicine according to the NYT

What we learned in 2018 in Health & Medicine according to the NYT

Developments in medicine and health that we’re still thinking about at year’s end. It’s not easy to say that any particular development in health or medicine was the most important in a given year [Ref – NYT]. But if we had to choose some highlights, we’d opt for these unforgettable events and findings.       From left, Douglas A. Warner III, Memorial Sloan Kettering’s board chairman; Dr. José Baselga, its former chief medical officer; and Dr. Craig B. Thompson, its chief executive, at its charity ball in New York last year. Credit Rebecca Smeyne for The New York Times Conflicts of interest

New Cholesterol Guidelines Personalize Risk and Add Treatments – JAMA 2019 Feb 6

New Cholesterol Guidelines Personalize Risk and Add Treatments – JAMA 2019 Feb 6

In the new guidelines, statin treatment targets are back for both primary and secondary prevention. Patients whose 10-year risk of ASCVD is 20% or more should try to reduce LDL-C levels by at least 50%, the same goal as for people with clinical ASCVD. Those with more intermediate risk should aim for at least a 30% decrease. The new update was met with considerably less controversy than the last incarnation, which deemphasized LDL-C treatment targets and introduced the AHA/ACC ASCVD risk calculator. The updated guidelines and a companion AHA/ACC special report on risk assessment tools acknowledge that the calculator estimates risk for an average

Screening for breast cancer in order to reduce the burden of breast cancer in Sri Lanka – the way forward – Is mammography an essential tool?

Screening for breast cancer in order to reduce the burden of breast cancer in Sri Lanka – the way forward – Is mammography an essential tool?

Screening for breast cancer in order to reduce the burden of breast cancer in Sri Lanka – the way forward – Is mammography an essential tool? Yes, mammography is an essential tool for screening for breast cancer. To what extent mammography reduces the burden of breast cancer will depend on the context, country and the research. The NCCP guidelines published in 2014 gives a comprehensive detail in ‘Early Detection and Management of Breast Symptoms’. This is valid even today. [Ref] Q1 Does mammography screening decrease the incidence or mortality rate from breast cancer? N0, because mammography detects breast tumours in the asymptomatic

Coach, Don’t Just Teach

Coach, Don’t Just Teach

  ‘Both teaching and coaching are of course helping someone learn a particular skill or sharing a certain piece of knowledge. Teaching however, is primarily a one way interaction. A person that knows something shows you how to do something or tells you some piece of information that they know. Coaching on the other had requires a cyclical, ongoing interaction. In order to coach someone, you need to first teach them something, then observe the student, and then provide feedback again. Unless all three of these interactions are taking place, it cannot be considered coaching. The biggest difference is that,

Using AI to catch irregular heartbeats and to detect cervical cancer – NIH, USA

Using AI to catch irregular heartbeats and to detect cervical cancer – NIH, USA

An arrhythmia is a problem with the rate or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slowly, or with an irregular rhythm. When a heart beats too fast, the condition is called tachycardia. When a heart beats too slowly, the condition is called bradycardia. The most common test used to diagnose an arrhythmia is an electrocardiogram (EKG or ECG). [Ref] “Thanks to advances in wearable health technologies, it’s now possible for people to monitor their heart rhythms at home for days, weeks, or even months via wireless electrocardiogram (EKG) patches. In fact, my Apple Watch

Exercise: the miracle cure – Academy of Royal Medical Colleges, UK

Exercise: the miracle cure – Academy of Royal Medical Colleges, UK

‘The big four “proximate” causes of preventable ill-health are: smoking, poor nutrition, lack of physical activity and alcohol excess. Of these, the importance of regular exercise is the least well-known. Relatively low levels of increased activity can make a huge difference. All the evidence suggests small amounts of regular exercise (five times a week for 30 minutes each time for adults) brings dramatic benefits. The exercise should be moderate – enough to get a person slightly out of breath and/or sweaty, and with an increased heart rate. This report is a thorough review of that evidence. Regular exercise can prevent

The health impacts of screen time – a guide for clinicians and parents from RCPCH-UK

The health impacts of screen time – a guide for clinicians and parents from RCPCH-UK

Current advise to limit screen time for children [Ref-1], [Ref-2] has changed significantly with the latest 2019 guideline from the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health. It states that ‘The evidence base for a direct ‘toxic’ effect of screen time is contested, and the evidence of harm is often overstated.’ Key messages The evidence base for a direct ‘toxic’ effect of screen time is contested, and the evidence of harm is often overstated. The majority of the literature that does exist looks only at television screen time. Evidence is weak for a threshold to guide children and parents to