Meet ‘Symptom Checkers’ – Isabel and Babylon

Meet ‘Symptom Checkers’ – Isabel and Babylon

People increasingly search the Internet regarding their health issues and a Google search may be the commonest in most instances. Even doctors ‘Google’ for a diagnosis [Ref]. Recently there has been a proliferation of more sophisticated programs called ‘symptom checkers‘ that attempt to more effectively provide a potential diagnosis for patients and direct them to the appropriate care setting. Many healthcare institutions provide symptom checkers such as  WebMD, Mayo Clinic,  HealthLine.   Isabel and Balylon are two different applications that use different programming techniques to provide people with their symptom evaluation. Isabel uses the orthodox text-searching. Babylon uses a ‘Chatbot‘

Technological Transformation

Technological Transformation

Technology has enabled bionics and artificial intelligence, each of which can have important applications in health care. As we continue to substitute body parts with machinery, however, we might wonder, “What makes us human?” This drawing interrogates the relationship between humanity and embodiment, specifically in neck and facial musculature and brain structures. This image represents humankind’s union with technology. It shows the brain turning into a collection of integrated computer circuits and the neck muscles evolving into mechanization-ready cables, pumps, and wires. In artificial intelligence (AI), boundaries distinguishing life and technology are challenged. We wonder, “Is it possible for machines

Using AI to catch irregular heartbeats and to detect cervical cancer – NIH, USA

Using AI to catch irregular heartbeats and to detect cervical cancer – NIH, USA

An arrhythmia is a problem with the rate or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slowly, or with an irregular rhythm. When a heart beats too fast, the condition is called tachycardia. When a heart beats too slowly, the condition is called bradycardia. The most common test used to diagnose an arrhythmia is an electrocardiogram (EKG or ECG). [Ref] “Thanks to advances in wearable health technologies, it’s now possible for people to monitor their heart rhythms at home for days, weeks, or even months via wireless electrocardiogram (EKG) patches. In fact, my Apple Watch