Gene editing and Designer ‘CRISPR’ babies

Gene editing and Designer ‘CRISPR’ babies

  Gene editing or genome editing is the technique used to replace or cutting pieces of DNA [Ref]. Using a component known as  CRISPR to precisely pinpoint the sequence of DNA in the gene, an enzyme called Cas9 is used to cut through the part identified. It can also replace a removed part by another sequence of DNA. This technique can be used to replace a faculty gene or change a gene to make it behave differently. Gene editing can have very good effects like altering a disease gene or modifying a diseased gene to behave normally. However gene editing

Technological Transformation

Technological Transformation

Technology has enabled bionics and artificial intelligence, each of which can have important applications in health care. As we continue to substitute body parts with machinery, however, we might wonder, “What makes us human?” This drawing interrogates the relationship between humanity and embodiment, specifically in neck and facial musculature and brain structures. This image represents humankind’s union with technology. It shows the brain turning into a collection of integrated computer circuits and the neck muscles evolving into mechanization-ready cables, pumps, and wires. In artificial intelligence (AI), boundaries distinguishing life and technology are challenged. We wonder, “Is it possible for machines

How Should Clinicians Engage With Online Health Information?

How Should Clinicians Engage With Online Health Information?

From the ‘AMA Journal of Ethics – Illuminating the Art of Medicine’ Many adults, physicians, and medical students search the internet for health information. Open access has many benefits, but the variable quality of internet health information—ranging from evidence based to false—raises ethical concerns. Using Wikipedia as a case study, this article argues that everyone engaging with internet health information has ethical responsibilities. Those hosting and writing for health websites should ensure that information is evidence based, accurate, up to date, and readable and be transparent about conflicts of interest. Health care professionals, including medical students, have both ethical responsibilities

What we learned in 2018 in Health & Medicine according to the NYT

What we learned in 2018 in Health & Medicine according to the NYT

Developments in medicine and health that we’re still thinking about at year’s end. It’s not easy to say that any particular development in health or medicine was the most important in a given year [Ref – NYT]. But if we had to choose some highlights, we’d opt for these unforgettable events and findings.       From left, Douglas A. Warner III, Memorial Sloan Kettering’s board chairman; Dr. José Baselga, its former chief medical officer; and Dr. Craig B. Thompson, its chief executive, at its charity ball in New York last year. Credit Rebecca Smeyne for The New York Times Conflicts of interest

Why aren’t medical devices regulated like drugs? BMJ

Why aren’t medical devices regulated like drugs? BMJ

What are medical devices? Examples of medical devices include surgical lasers, wheelchairs, sutures, pacemakers, vascular grafts, intraocular lenses, and orthopedic pins. Examples of diagnostics include in vitro diagnostic reagents and test kits such as pregnancy test kits, and imaging systems such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). [Ref]. One of the new types that may be categorised as a ‘medical device’ is the Apple watch 4  According to the FDA, “A medical device is an instrument, apparatus, implement, machine, contrivance, implant, in vitro reagent, or other similar or related article, including a component part or accessory which is: recognized in the