Coach, Don’t Just Teach

Coach, Don’t Just Teach

  ‘Both teaching and coaching are of course helping someone learn a particular skill or sharing a certain piece of knowledge. Teaching however, is primarily a one way interaction. A person that knows something shows you how to do something or tells you some piece of information that they know. Coaching on the other had requires a cyclical, ongoing interaction. In order to coach someone, you need to first teach them something, then observe the student, and then provide feedback again. Unless all three of these interactions are taking place, it cannot be considered coaching. The biggest difference is that,

Exercise: the miracle cure – Academy of Royal Medical Colleges, UK

Exercise: the miracle cure – Academy of Royal Medical Colleges, UK

‘The big four “proximate” causes of preventable ill-health are: smoking, poor nutrition, lack of physical activity and alcohol excess. Of these, the importance of regular exercise is the least well-known. Relatively low levels of increased activity can make a huge difference. All the evidence suggests small amounts of regular exercise (five times a week for 30 minutes each time for adults) brings dramatic benefits. The exercise should be moderate – enough to get a person slightly out of breath and/or sweaty, and with an increased heart rate. This report is a thorough review of that evidence. Regular exercise can prevent

The health impacts of screen time – a guide for clinicians and parents from RCPCH-UK

The health impacts of screen time – a guide for clinicians and parents from RCPCH-UK

Current advise to limit screen time for children [Ref-1], [Ref-2] has changed significantly with the latest 2019 guideline from the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health. It states that ‘The evidence base for a direct ‘toxic’ effect of screen time is contested, and the evidence of harm is often overstated.’ Key messages The evidence base for a direct ‘toxic’ effect of screen time is contested, and the evidence of harm is often overstated. The majority of the literature that does exist looks only at television screen time. Evidence is weak for a threshold to guide children and parents to

Whole-Fat or Nonfat Dairy? The debate continues – JAMA 2018

Whole-Fat or Nonfat Dairy? The debate continues – JAMA 2018

Forty year ago US federal government recommended first recommended that everyone except young children opt for low- fat or nonfat dairy products over high-fat dairy products as part of an overall goal of reducing saturated fat intake and calories. However recent studies have suggested that high-fat milk, cheese, and yogurt are at least as healthful as their low-fat or nonfat counterparts, and their authors are questioning the wisdom of advising people to avoid whole milk and products made with it. Just as the evidence suggests that not all food sources of saturated fats—ie, animals, plants, and dairy—are the same, neither

Primary prevention with statins for older adults

Primary prevention with statins for older adults

Primary prevention remains important for adults over 65 years because significant cardiovascular morbidity after an initial event. Up to one third have a further stroke or MI or die within three years. Current guidance on lipid management in older adults is inconsistent: the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends statins for primary prevention up to age 84, the European Society of Cardiology recommends treatment to age 65, and the American Heart Association (AHA) up to age 75. For those with type 2 diabetes, NICE recommends statin prescription guided by a CVD risk calculation, whereas the AHA recommends

Potatoes & French Fries

Potatoes & French Fries

If French fries come from potatoes, and potatoes are a vegetable, and vegetables are good for you, then what’s the harm in eating French fries?  Plenty, say experts and nutritionists, including Eric Rimm, a professor in the departments of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard who called potatoes “starch bombs.” Potatoes are rich in starch and have a high glycemic index, which has been associated with an increased risk of developing obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) (3). However, compared with other common carbohydrate sources, potatoes have a low energy density because of their high water content (4). In addition, potatoes provide other

Does the Cochrane Collaboration have the last word in Evidence? – I guess.. NO

Does the Cochrane Collaboration have the last word in Evidence? – I guess.. NO

  The HPV vaccine controversy – The background of the story…. We have to know all sides of the story before deciding what to happened and is it the truth   Prof. Peter C. Gøtzsche becomes member of the Cochrane Governing Board 2017 Message from the Governing Board – PG’s expulsion Statement from Cochrane’s Governing Board – Wednesday 26th September 2018 PG’s version as to why he was expelled BMJ SCIENCE – Evidence-based medicine group in turmoil after expulsion of co-founder The International Society for Ethical Psychology and Psychiatry announces its full support for physician Peter Gøtzsche – link PLOS BlogSpot

SIGECAPS, SSRIs, and Silence — Life as a Depressed Med Student

SIGECAPS, SSRIs, and Silence — Life as a Depressed Med Student

SIGECAPS is the mnemonic we medical students memorize to learn the core symptoms of depression: sleep, interest, guilt, energy, concentration, appetite, psychomotor retardation, and suicidality. The practice questions we spend hours answering in preparation for Step 1 of the U.S. Medical Licensing Exam twist patient vignettes in tricky ways to fool us into misdiagnosing depression as insomnia in elderly women or attention deficit–hyperactivity disorder in inattentive adolescents. But despite their tricks, I would always nail those questions. The key was that if you looked hard enough, SIGECAPS was always hidden somewhere — an offhand mention of fatigue here, a seemingly

The latest on Chocolates and Cardiovascular Disease Risk

The latest on Chocolates and Cardiovascular Disease Risk

With a choking heart I read this in the Latest BMJ about Chocolates ” Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, which have anti-platelet, anti-oxidant, and anti-inflammatory effects. Even so, the idea that eating chocolate would protect against heart disease was always likely to be wishful thinking. An analysis of data from the Women’s Health Initiative will bring chocolate lovers down to earth (Am J Clin Nutrdoi:10.1093/ajcn/nqy073). For 13 years, the study followed more than 80 000 women who were past menopause, and found that those who ate chocolate were no less likely to develop heart disease or stroke than those who never

Antibiotics for uncomplicated acute appendicectomy

Antibiotics for uncomplicated acute appendicectomy

Antibiotics-first strategy for uncomplicated acute appendicitis in adults: A systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials LINK BACKGROUND: Acute appendicitis is the most common surgical diagnosis in young patients, with lifetime prevalence of about 7%. Debate remains on whether uncomplicated AA should be operated or not. Aim of this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was to assess current evidence on antibiotic treatment for uncomplicated AA compared to standard surgical treatment. METHODS: Systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, EMBASE, Medline, Google Scholar and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases for randomized controlled trials comparing antibiotic therapy (AT) and